Honoring 24 of our teachers by selecting them to be included in the 2nd edition of “Lifting the Curtain: the disgrace we call urban high school education”

It is with great pleasure that I announce the two dozen teachers whose outstanding insights into the real problems with education were selected for inclusion in the 2nd edition of Lifting the Curtain:  The disgrace we call urban high school education.

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The quality and number of submissions was amazing.  These teacher passages will be embedded in the main chapters of the 2nd edition — and not be just part of some marketing pages.  Teachers, parents, and legislators everywhere will benefit greatly by reading their views!

Tomorrow we will announce the three top winners who have been selected by the panel as the best of the best!

——————————————————-

Readiness for College

  • (Included) Monique Anair, assistant college professor, New Mexico
  • (Included) Anon, College writing teacher, Pennsylvania

To what extent have you witnessed instances of administrative “bullying” to intimidate teachers, including intentional misuse of a charge such as “inappropriate touching.”

  • (Included) M. Shannon Hernandez, College professor and author (and ex  teacher), New York

The impact of standardized testing on your classes and pressure to pass children

  • (Included) Monica S, high school SPED teacher, Washington

If you are homeschooling, what were the major factors that led you to that choice?

  • (Included) Ashley Kimler, parent, Oregon

Charter schools

  • (Included) Sarah B, Middle school social studies and language arts teacher, Colorado

Student attitudes and home life

  • (Included) Louise K, retired high school English teacher, California

The loss of Arts and elective courses in schools

  • (Included) Anonymous, spouse of high school band teacher, Florida
  • (Included) Regina Paul, President of a non-profit educational consulting organization, based in New York
  • (Included)  Pavliv, Gregory, Retired music teacher K-12  and Music Education Advocate, New Jersey

 Common Core

  • (Included) Lois Jarman, High school modern languages teacher, Maryland
  • (Included) Nathaniel C. Ashbaugh, Middle school Music teacher, New Mexico

Your experiences with inclusion classes.

  • (Included)  Jeanie Clemmens, retired high school math teacher, Pennsylvania
  • (Included) Maryann Schneider, High school SPED teacher, Pennsylvania
  • (Included) Anon elementary school teacher, Florida

Current levels of student expectations and motivations

  • (Included) James Howson, retired middle school English teacher and author, Connecticut
  • (Included) James Ryan, Motivational trainer and homeschooler, Virginia

Degree of parent involvement – especially parents of struggling students

  • (Included) Carol L, Retired high school English teacher, PA
  • (Included) Anon, retired high school English teacher, California

The impact on children when they learn a school will exert substantial pressure on teachers to find a way to pass them (and forced dumbing down of coursework)

  • (Included) Jacqueline Goodwin, retired high school LOTE teacher, NY
  • (Included) Anonymous, College professor and High school English teacher, Illinois

The pressure to dumb-down teaching, allow make-overs, or give extra-credit packages to insure children pass regardless of effort.

  • (Included) JoAnne P, retired English teacher, Wisconsin

The attitude and “esprit-de-corps” at your school – happy campers or burned out teachers

  • (Included) Anonymous, high school teacher, left profession after 4 years, Colorado
  • (Included) J.B.Banks, substitute teacher, Chicago IL
This entry was posted in Charter Schools, Common core, Education, Education reform, High schools, homeschooling, Inclusion classes, Music and arts courses, Public Education, Standardized testing, Teachers, Teaching, Urban High Schools and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to Honoring 24 of our teachers by selecting them to be included in the 2nd edition of “Lifting the Curtain: the disgrace we call urban high school education”

  1. Elle Knowles says:

    Reblogged this on knowleselle and commented:
    I’m not just promoting this book and website because I’m listed down there under ‘The loss of Arts and elective courses in schools’ as an anonymous winning submission, but because I really think this will be a great insight into education as it is today for teachers, students, and parents.
    It was also a great honor to be included!

    Like

  2. Pingback: Five outstanding teachers — the best of the best! The top prize winners in our call for submissions to share teacher views of the REAL problems with education. | Lifting the Curtain

  3. Pingback: Winning Is Just The Icing On The Cake | knowleselle

  4. Pingback: Five outstanding teachers — the best of the best! The top prize winners in our call for submissions to share teacher views of the REAL problems with education. | Lifting the Curtain

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