An insightful review by Margo Dill at Women on Writing helping spread the word!

It is hard to express how great it is when someone looks past the book to the actual issues so hurting the education of our urban high school children.  Ms Dill’s review, alone, will do more to get the word out than all the books in the world!  My favorite lines in the review:  “One of his main points is right now, this is what is going on in our schools, and we are failing our kids. Shouldn’t we shake things up a bit, change things around, to reach more teens and bring them success? This book makes me want to shout from the mountaintop… Yes!

If you don’t know the WoW site, and are a writer (or a wannabe writer like me) this is a great site.  You don’t even have to be a woman to benefit from it! 🙂  Unlike so many “Writer Sites” that seem to be little more than scams, the WoW site offers a lot of help, resources,  and value-added for writers.  Check them out at    http://wow-womenonwriting.com/

I paste the actual review below, but you should head to the WoW blog page (and follow it!) to see the nature of their ideas and help for writers at http://muffin.wow-womenonwriting.com/

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Lifting the Curtain: The Disgrace We Call Urban High School Education by D. A. Russell (Review and Giveaway)

It’s probably no surprise to most readers, who pick upLifting the Curtain: The Disgrace We Call Urban High School Education by D. A. Russell, that there are problems in our cities’ high schools. Media likes to blame the teachers and administrators, and often legislators create laws to try and “fix” the problem. What’s refreshing about Lifting the Curtain is Mr. Russell is an urban high school teacher. He is in the middle of the problem, and he has researched it. Even better, he’s not just a whistle blower. He’s created several workable and practical solutions to tackle the issues that plague our high schools.

In the first 2/3 of the book, Russell explains why he writes about this issue as well as a survey he created for urban educators and high school students (and the results) and then eight systemic failures in the schools. The last third of the book is the solutions–there’s not just one as he points out. It’s not JUST the teachers, or ONLY parents, or THE administrators. The pages are adorned with illustrations from a tenth grade student, Jessica Fitzpatrick, who took Russell’s stick figures and created cartoon-like drawings to capture his points.

So what are some of these systemic failures that Russell sees from his own experiences and from studying the surveys? Here’s just a sampling of his list: unqualified administrators, rampant cronyism, inclusion classes, special education hijacked by parents, burned out teachers, and teacher unions. Although you may or may not agree with each of his points, his passion for getting to the root of the problem and helping teenagers is all over these pages. One of his main points is right now, this is what is going on in our schools, and we are failing our kids. Shouldn’t we shake things up a bit, change things around, to reach more teens and bring them success? This book makes me want to shout from the mountaintop… Yes!

His solutions may also be controversial to some, but these are ideas you will see on blogs and in the news. Again, he is saying, “We need to do this. We need to change. Here’s how we start.” What I love is that he’s not just pointing out the problem, and he’s not targeting any one group as being wrong. His solutions range from fixing trust and integrity issues within the walls of the schools to allowing children to receive failing grades so they know they need to try harder, from focused professional development plans for teachers to make-up days for absences or truancy and more.

If you believe in education and want to help urban students succeed, Lifting the Curtain is a book for you to check out. All educators would benefit from reading it, regardless of where or whom they teach. Mr. Russell is brave to tackle this emotional and tough topic, and he does so with grace and passion.

This entry was posted in Common core, Education, High schools, Public Education, Teachers, Teaching, Urban High Schools and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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